Florida Quitclaim Deed Tips and Tricks from Boca Raton to Palm Beach

Florida quitclaim deed - Boca Raton, FLFocus on Documents beyond Broward County Divorce Records for a Truly Fast Divorce

In this post, Delray Beach divorce lawyer, Jordan Gerber, Esq. explains the importance of a Florida quitclaim deed.

Even if every person you know from Boca Raton to Palm Beach has given you the rundown on Family Law, a lack of focus on real estate issues can come back to haunt you.

I Want a Fast Divorce so My Motto is the Less Broward County Divorce Records the Better

The decision is made. You’ve spent hours the books your spiritual guide has recommended. You’ve spent days in a sweat lodge at a Costa Rica hotel meditating on it. Your best friend and the guy that cuts your hair have heard about it to the point where you’re sure one more heart to heart will result in a slap in the face. Or at least a very unfortunate bald spot. Finally, you have come to the realization that your marriage has reached its expiration date. Whatever time divorce takes, you’re ready. It doesn’t matter if every person from Boca Raton to Palm Beach weighs in, you know what’s best for you. You want a fast divorce and are emotionally ready to move on. Physically, however, that’s a different story.

Florida quitclaim deed - Boca Raton, FLGet Familiar with the Florida Quitclaim Deed so that a Fast Divorce isn’t a Misnomer

In  Who Gets The House In A Divorce? The Marital Home Problem, the focus was the marital home being upside down in many cases from Boca Raton to Palm Beach. This is easily confirmed by a quick online perusal of public records. Regardless of equity, your main concern is where you’re going to be laying your newly single head down at night. The discussion of who gets the house in a divorce can be complex. As a result, this isn’t good news for anyone in the market (no pun intended) for a fast divorce.

When there are minor children born of the marriage, the general rule is that the parent with the greater time sharing should stay in the house until the youngest child reaches majority or that parent remarries. The parties remain tenants in common. Each is responsible for the expenses associated with the property until the period of exclusive use and possession ends. Worried about coming home to find the man formerly known as Mr. Wonderful sitting on the couch in his underwear watching football? Or the woman formerly known as Sweet Cheeks waiting in the kitchen with a steak knife to welcome you home from your first night back in the saddle? Don’t worry, Broward County divorce records can negate a person’s right to enter the premises. Even if that person has an ownership interest in the property. That should solve the problem of any uninvited house guests.

Florida quitclaim deed - Boca Raton, FLThe Definition of a Florida Quitclaim Deed from Boca Raton to Palm Beach

This document is separate from  Broward County divorce records. In short, it’s a legal instrument which is used to transfer interest in real property. It’s a record requested by many divorcing couples.  A state require that it be recorded as it’s used for informing the public of who owns the property.

The entity who transfers the interest is the grantor and the recipient is the grantee. When the document is properly executed, it transfers any interest the grantor has in the property to a grantee.

The settlement agreement forms divorces use to transfer an interest in the marital home often don’t include a time is of the essence provision. Consequently, this puts a wrench in obtaining a fast divorce. In this case, a family court judge will be wary to tell the non-compliant party to get moving (again, no pun intended). As a result, your ex can take his or her sweet time signing a Florida quitclaim deed. No bueno. This is especially true since a Broward County family court won’t modify a property settlement agreement.

Florida quitclaim deed - Boca Raton, FLThe Difference Between a Florida Quitclaim Deed and a Warranty Deed – Boca Raton to Palm Beach

If property exchanges hands anywhere from Boca Raton to Palm Beach, both a quitclaim and warranty deed transfers an interest in property. However, you won’t find either in the Florida forms provided by the clerk.

A quitclaim deed is most common when property isn’t sold. This is because the deed is usually between two people who are well acquainted and know the other party’s background. Consequently, a Florida quitclaim deed conveys only whatever interest the Grantor has in the property. It doesn’t guarantee that the grantor is the rightful owner and has the right to transfer the property.

In contrast, a warranty deed conveys title to a grantee with a guarantee of good clear title to the property. This means it’s free from any interests held by other people. Warranty deeds are the traditional form of deed used in residential home sales between unrelated parties. This is because it provides a degree of protection to purchasers that the Florida quitclaim deed doesn’t offer.

The bottom line? A skilled divorce lawyer knows that a fast divorce often means cutting corners. And when it comes to non-modifiable property settlement agreements, this is never a good idea. After all, and quite literally, no one wants to be left out in the cold after Florida divorce.

Click  Palm Beach Divorce Lawyer to schedule your consultation. Proudly Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach, West Palm Beach, and all of Palm Beach County, South Florida.

Boca Raton Divorce Lawyers Practice Areas Include:

  • Florida Prenuptial Agreement

  • Post Marital Agreement

  • Simplified Dissolution of Marriage

  • Contested Divorce

  • Uncontested Divorce

  • High Net Worth Divorce

  • Quitclaim Deed

  • Florida Alimony Laws

  • Equitable Distribution

  • Division of Retirement Benefits In Florida Divorce

  • Fast Divorce

  • Division of Property

  • Imputing Income

  • Dissipation of Marital Assets

  • Modification of Alimony Payments

  • Florida Modification of Child Support

  • Modification Of Child Custody In Florida

  • Florida Child Support Enforcement

 

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